Friday, April 8, 2016

The Borden Murders - Review

The Borden Murders: Lizzie Borden and the Trial of the CenturyThe Borden Murders: Lizzie Borden and the Trial of the Century by Sarah Miller
My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Published 2016 by Schwartz & Wade

Here’s middle-grade nonfiction that reads like a thriller. With murder, court battles, and sensational newspaper headlines, the story of Lizzie Borden is compulsively readable and perfect for the Common Core.

Lizzie Borden took an axe, gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done, she gave her father forty-one.

In a compelling, linear narrative, Miller takes readers along as she investigates a brutal crime: the August 4, 1892, murders of wealthy and prominent Andrew and Abby Borden. The accused? Mild-mannered and highly respected Lizzie Borden, daughter of Andrew and stepdaughter of Abby. Most of what is known about Lizzie’s arrest and subsequent trial (and acquittal) comes from sensationalized newspaper reports; as Miller sorts fact from fiction, and as a legal battle gets under way, a gripping portrait of a woman and a town emerges.

With inserts featuring period photos and newspaper clippings—and, yes, images from the murder scene—readers will devour this nonfiction book that reads like fiction.



It was highly informative. Highly. Like loaded with it.
But that's all it was.

And while interesting, it was kind of bland.

For a non-fiction boo directed to younger readers I didn't really see how it would grab their attention.
I remember reading about Lizzie Borden in idle school and knowing myself at the time I would have turned to a book like this one to learn more. And maybe if that had been the case when I started it my thoughts would be different.

But reading it I just started feeling like why do I even want to know more; knowing what I know about this case, it just seemed like I was being told what I already knew. There wasn't much of a "Whoa, tell me more!" moment.
This is a book about a woman who brutally murdered her parents with an ax, how does that moment not exist?

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